Photo of street signs with words Trusted and Reliable

Validity and Reliability in Qualitative Research

Posted

Post prepared and written by Joe Tise, PhD, Senior Education Researcher In this series we have discovered the many ways in which evidence of validity can be produced and ways in which reliable data can be produced. To be sure, the bulk of this series was focused on quantitative research, but any mixed-methods or qualitative […]

Continue Reading
Image of venn diagram between true ability and observed score

Reliability in Education Research: A Deeper Examination

Posted

Presented by Joe Tise, PhD, Senior Education Researcher at IACE To be confident in claims we make about something we assess, the assessment must produce reliable data. A thermometer that says it’s 72 degrees Fahrenheit one minute, but 56 degrees the next would not instill confidence. Likewise, a measure of a student’s computational thinking skills […]

Continue Reading
Image of signpost for validity and eliability

Validity in Educational Research: A Deeper Examination

Posted

Presented by Joe Tise, PhD, Senior Education Researcher at IACE The concept of validity has evolved over millennia. Some of the earliest examples of how validity influenced society at scale comes from the ancient Chinese Civil Service exam programs (Suen & Yu, 2006). Back in 195 BCE, Emperor Liu Bang decreed that men of virtue […]

Continue Reading
Four images of arrows and targets to represent when reliability and validity can be achieved.

Demystifying Reliability and Validity in Educational Research

Posted

Post prepared and written by Joe Tise, PhD, Senior Education Researcher In the past, validity and reliability may have been explained to you by way of an analogy: validity refers to how close to the “bullseye” you can get on a dart board, while reliability is how consistently you throw your darts in the same […]

Continue Reading
Snapshot of practice brief

Podcasts! Considering K-5 Computing Education Practices

Posted

We’re super excited to announce our long-awaited series on K-5 computing education practices! Our podcasts provide insights from discussions among teachers as they consider meaningful research and how they could adopt new practices into their classrooms. For educators, these podcasts are meant to provide you with information on various research studies that are may be […]

Continue Reading
Logo for SIGCSE 2024 technical symposium

Join Us at the 2024 ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium

Posted

We’re always excited to attend the ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium, and this year is no exception! You can catch IACE team members (Laycee Thigpen, Joe Tise, Julie Smith, and Monica McGill) at the following events. (Pre-symposium events are invitation only.) For all the rest, please stop by and say Hi! We’d love to hear about […]

Continue Reading
Cover page for Landscape Study for CME Group Foundation

Key Levers for Advancing K-12 Computer Science Education in Chicago, in Illinois, and in the United States

Posted

Computer science has become an essential skill for K-12 students. As the demand for computing jobs grows, there is a pressing need to advance K-12 CS education across the nation. To achieve this, there are several key levers that can advance change, including policy changes, teacher training and development, increased access to technology and resources, […]

Continue Reading

“Teaching Inclusive AI in Computer Science” Event

Posted

By Joe Tise, PhD, Senior Education Researcher, CSEdResearch.org Driving into the heart of Washington, D.C. is a unique experience. Mixed with thousands of business people, sight-seers, and the occasional politician shuffling to and fro, is the sense of optimism for what could be. Every significant social, policy, or and/or economic movement that had national—and often […]

Continue Reading
Zone of proximal development theory th

Constructivism/Sociocultural

Posted

Behaviorism highlighted the influence of the environment, information processing theory essentially ignored it, and social-cognitive theory tried to strike a balance between the two by acknowledging its potential influence. Constructivist (also known as sociocultural) theorists take it a step further.  According to constructivist theories (which can either focus more on individual or on societal construction […]

Continue Reading
Triangle with behavior, personal factors, and environment in each corner and arrows in between.

Social Cognitive Theory

Posted

Presented by Joe Tise, PhD, Educational Psychology & Senior Education Researcher at CSEdResearch.org In light of these two influential (albeit largely opposing) theories of learning, we see that both theories account for unique aspects of learning despite their limitations. Still, neither behaviorist nor information-processing theories account for one prominent form of learning, with which all […]

Continue Reading